How Your Body Changes When You Eat Enough Fruits and Vegetables

How Your Body Changes When You Eat Enough Fruits and Vegetables

What Fruits Slow Down Aging?

Five a day was the first. Fill half of your plate with fruits and vegetables today. What exactly do you need? Why does it matter, more importantly?

Although there is much debate in the nutrition field about what foods are and are not healthy, almost everyone can agree that we should all eat more fruits and vegetables. Additionally, you don’t need to be a mathematician to understand the recommendation to consume five servings of fruits and vegetables each day. Or would you?\
According to research, consuming 400 grams of fruits and vegetables daily has been linked to a lower risk of developing chronic diseases like dementia, heart disease, cancer, and stroke. They interpreted that as five servings per day, which for many years was the main public health message. Thanks to the USDA’s MyPlate recommendations, the message has been further condensed to “load half your plate” with produce today. Despite the catchy slogan, just 10% of Americans can consistently meet their demands.

According to Taylor Wallace, Ph.D., the principal food and nutrition scientist for the Produce for Better Health Foundation, “the messaging hasn’t really changed, as much as the USDA discovered that it’s easier for people to relate to a plate visually.” The magic number every day is still five.Increasing your consumption has some major advantages. Here are the results that, according to science, you can expect if you consume the recommended amount of five servings every day.

Your chance of developing heart disease may be lower.

According to Wallace, the evidence showing the advantages of fruits and vegetables in preventing cardiovascular disease is the strongest. Produce is so beneficial that, according to research published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, those who consume around six servings (or 18 ounces) of fruits and vegetables daily have a 16% lower risk of dying from coronary heart disease than those who consume less than 112 ounces.

The soluble fiber in produce is a significant factor since it can assist prevent the reabsorption of cholesterol from the colon and can aid
Reduce blood cholesterol levels, says Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health professor of nutrition and epidemiology and study co-author Edward Giovannucci, M.D., M.P.H. Apples, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, pears, oranges, peas, and grapefruits are excellent sources of soluble fiber. Additionally, fiber decreases the absorption of glucose, benefiting both your blood sugar and heart. According to Giovannucci, when sugars are absorbed fast in the intestine, blood glucose levels rise, which causes an immediate spike in insulin levels. High insulin and glucose levels over time can cause diabetes and blood vessel damage, which results in heart disease.

Produce has many heart-healthy advantages beyond fiber. Vitamin C, an antioxidant that reduces inflammation that damages arteries, is present in foods including bell peppers, citrus, kiwis, broccoli, strawberries, and others.

compared to people who consume less of this nutrient, they are less likely to die from cardiovascular disease.

Your chance of having a stroke may be lower.

According to the World Health Organization, consuming 712 servings of produce a day may lower the risk of stroke by 10% to 19%. Potassium is partially to blame for this. Produce has the highest concentration of this mineral, which lowers blood pressure, of any food group. Additionally, a leading risk factor for stroke is excessive blood pressure.

But isn’t sodium the main factor in high blood pressure? Actually, that just provides a portion of the story. For example, when you consume a salty pickle, the sodium draws water into your cells, raising your blood pressure. However, potassium encourages the removal of water from cells. Compared to people who consume less of this nutrient, they are less likely to die from cardiovascular disease.

Your chance of having a stroke may be lower
.

According to the World Health Organization, consuming 712 servings of produce a day may lower the risk of stroke by 10% to 19%. Potassium is partially to blame for this. Produce has the highest concentration of this mineral, which lowers blood pressure, of any food group. Additionally, a leading risk factor for stroke is excessive blood pressure.

lowering the heart rate. According to studies, people who consume extremely high salt and potassium intakes do not experience hypertension issues because their electrolytes are in equilibrium. Bananas, avocados, and potatoes are examples of fruits and vegetables that help provide the mineral potassium.

They’re a lock for preventing strokes because they fulfill our need and are naturally low in sodium.

Your mental health may improve.

Colorful produce can be a valuable ally whether your objective is promoting emotional health today or preventing dementia in the future. Consuming five or more servings per day is associated with better mental health, specifically less depression, according to a 2020 Nutrients systematic review. Any produce was beneficial, but the finest fruits and vegetables for the brain were citrus, bananas, berries, apples, kiwis, cucumbers, carrots, lettuce, tomatoes, and leafy greens like spinach. Researchers don’t know for sure why produce is good for your brain, but they do notice that certain nutrients, including B vitamins, vitamin C, carotenoids, polyphenols, and carbs high in fiber, are associated with higher brain function

New study shows how your body changes when you eat enough fruits and vegetables.

Many of us have heard that eating fruits and vegetables can help prevent heart disease, but the majority of us don’t actually eat enough of them. That’s not surprising, since they aren’t always the most appealing foods to eat by themselves—especially if you aren’t as young as you used to be and your digestion isn’t what it used to be either! But new research might convince more people to give fruits and vegetables a chance.

Fruit and Veggies Help Lower Cancer Risk
It’s no secret that fruit and veggies are good for us, but a new study helps quantify exactly how they might help ward off cancer. The research, published in Annals of Internal Medicine , found that eating an additional 7 servings of fruits and vegetables a day can lower your risk of certain cancers by up to 15 percent. It doesn’t sound like much—but it’s a big deal if you follow through on it (and other healthy lifestyle habits). Here are four ways getting more produce into your diet could help lower cancer risk. 1. Lowering Your Chances of Developing Colon Cancer: Eating a lot of fruits and vegetables can decrease your chances of developing colon cancer by as much as 30 percent, according to one study . Researchers aren’t entirely sure why there’s such a strong link between these foods and colon cancer risk, but it may have something to do with their ability to fight inflammation . Inflammation is associated with an increased chance of developing many types of diseases, including heart disease, diabetes , Alzheimer’s disease , and even some types of cancer.

Karen Ansel, MS, RDN

Fiber Content
If you’ve ever tried to lose weight, odds are good that a dietitian recommended upping your intake of fruits and veggies—and not just because they’re good for you; they may also make it easier to shed those unwanted pounds. That’s because unlike most other carbohydrate sources in our diets, produce comes with a healthy dose of dietary fiber.

Cattylove

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